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IU is serious about reducing costs of eTexts

Worried about textbook costs? So is IU. That's why the university recently signed agreements with several textbook publishers to dramatically reduce the costs of digital textbook and online content (eTexts) options for students.

Worried about textbook costs? So is IU. That's why the university recently signed agreements with several textbook publishers to dramatically reduce the costs of digital textbook and online content (eTexts) options for students.

Through the new agreements, students may save almost two-thirds off the retail price of some new books, or up to half off the cost of current eTexts offerings. Students will also have uninterrupted access to digital and/or printed hard copies while enrolled at the university.

Want to learn more? Join VP Wheeler for upcoming infoshares:

• IU Bloomington: 3pm, September 8, IMU, State Room East

• IUPUI: 10am, September 9, University Library, UL 0130

• Live broadcast: http://go.iu.edu/3Pk

IU student leaders have expressed support for the new agreements and their potential for significant cost-savings.

"Current eText offerings often cost more than used books or rentals, have too many restrictions, and expire after a limited period of use," said Corey Ariss, undergraduate student president at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. "IU's eText approach solves many of these problems, and the ability to search and annotate texts is excellent."

Justin Kingsolver, president of the IU Student Association in Bloomington, said, "IUSA is proud to lend our support to this initiative because of its commitment to cutting textbook costs to IU students and maintaining a proactive approach to sustainability issues."

IU's eTexts agreements follow two years of pilot testing with students and faculty. The university selected Courseload, an Indiana-based software company, to conduct the pilot. Courseload software integrates directly with Oncourse and enables students to tag, search, collaborate as a study group, and view multimedia on any computer or mobile device. It is also accessible for students with disabilities.

"The Courseload software in Oncourse was simple to learn and provided an efficient way for me to keep my notes organized for class," said IU Bloomington senior Joshua Davis, who participated in the pilot as part of his astronomy course. "I could access my textbook both online and offline, and I didn't have to lug another heavy book around campus. "

For more on eTexts at IU, visit:

http://etexts.iu.edu